Adding New Features to Virtual Point One (VP1)

    Ben Zastovnik, a physics major from Fresno State, worked at CERN during summer of 2008 on improving VP1 with ATLAS physicists Thomas Kittelmann (from University of Pittsburgh) and Edward Moyse (also from University of Pittsburg). Zastovnik was supported by College of Science and Mathematics (CSM), Instructionally Related Activities (IRA) from Associated Studetns Inc. (ASI), and Faculty Sponsored Student Research (FSSR) of Fresno State. VP1 is a 3D event display tool for ATLAS experiment. The Qt/OpenGL based application provides truthful and interactive 3D representations of both event and non-event data and serves a general-purpose role for ATLAS. Zastovnik's summer project was to improve VP1 with new features which include adding Monte Carlo truth vertices to VP1, new geometry and realistic colors for the Pixel detector in VP1. After 7 weeks of hard work by Zastovnik, all these new features were successfully introduced to VP1 and released to ATLAS collaboration by the end of his CERN trip. Zastovnik presented his research work on VP1 at a physics colloquium of Fresno State in Fall 2008. Fresno Bee the central valley newspaper, also interviewed him and reported his CERN experience in August 2008. Zastovnik graduated from CSU Fresno in 2009. His VP1 experience at CERN helped him land a software engineer position to work on flight simulators at Edwards Air Force Base in Lancaster, California.

 

    Inner Detector Environmental Monitoring Summary (IDEMS)

    Lawrence Carlson, a physics major at CSU Fresno, worked at CERN during summer of 2008 on IDEMS interface with the ATLAS Inner Detector Services (IDS) team (Dr. Steve McMahon, Dr. Saverio D'Auria, Dr. Urban Bitenc, Dr. Illona Kostyukhina, Dr. Luca Luisa, and Dr. Charlie Young). Carlson was supported by College of Science and Mathematics (CSM), Instructionally Related Activities (IRA) from Associated Studetns Inc. (ASI), and Faculty Sponsored Student Research (FSSR) of Fresno State. Carlson's project is to provide near real-time data analysis and weekly summaries on environmental variables using web-based tools and display these results graphically in the control room. The environmental variables include radiation level, magnetic field, temperature, gas, dew point measurements from over 1200 sensors. Carlson presented his work at Pixel working group meetings and continued working on this project after returning from CERN. He completed the project, with more than 50,000 lines of code, and released it to the ATLAS Inner Detector community by the end of 2008. His tools have been parts of the IDEMS in ATLAS Control Room during the ongoing ATLAS data taking. Carlson also worked at CERN and Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) during summers of 2009, 2010, and 2011.

     

    Semi-Conductor Tracker (SCT) Fatal Charge Dosage Study

    James MacDougall, a physics major from CSU Sacramento, worked at CERN during summer of 2009 on SCT fatal charge dosage study with ATLAS physicists Dr. Steve McMahon from Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in UK and Dr. Charlie Young from Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). MacDougall was supported by Hu Institute Summer Research Grant of CSU Sacramento. SCT, being closest to the interaction region where small "Big-Bangs" are created, is potentially subject to various beam loss scenarios. A clear understanding of the susceptibility of the SCT components to damages from beam loss is essential for the safe operation of the detector system. In beam loss scenarios the weak link within the modules appears to be the ABCD asic. This application specific integrated circuit is warranted by the manufacturers to withstand a 5nC charge application within 25ns, which is the period of the LHC bunch crossing. MacDougall built up test stand to validate the 5nC threshold, investigated the chip vs. charge performance in the region above 5nC, and derived charge dosage parameters for use in subsequent laser and testbeam exposures.

    In repetitive tests, both single-channel and multi-channel charge injections, the 5nC/25ns/chip safety threshold was validated. Single channel were found to withstand in excess of 65,000 repetitive charge pulses, over periods of several milliseconds, at various pulse time constants. It was confirmed that the ABCD chip does possess some significant additional protection above 5nC. The single channel electronic components and/or bonding connections were determined to be the experimental weak link and acting as protection links for the ABCD chip. Preliminary microscopic investigation yielded no indication of physical failure point.

    The results were presented twice to interested parties of the inner detector community at CERN. MacDougall also presented this work to faculty and students at physics colloquia on both the CSU Sacramento and CSU Fresno campuses. A project paper was also prepared which describes in detail the background, execution and results of the experiment. The paper was circulated to interested parties of the ATLAS inner detector community.

     

    Program officers at NSF's Office of International Science and Engineering (OISE) were impressed by McGovern's work and contacted Prof. Yongsheng Gao to offer support for McGovern's CERN trip. McGovern received $7650 (stipend of $3600, travel of $1350, and subsistence of $2700) from NSF's OISE in Nov. of 2010.
    The rediscovery of W and Z bosons from first ATLAS data is essential for calibration of the ATLAS detector, performance, and software system. Wilson worked with Dr. Harinder Bawa from Fresno State on this subject during his stay at CERN during the summer of 2010. He gave a physics colloquium at Fresno State in October 2010 and a presentation at the Central California Research Symposium in April 2011 which he received the "Best Graduate Student Presentation" award. Wilson was selected into the CSU Fresno delegation to compete in the 25th Annual California State University Student Research Competition in May 2011.

     

    Muon Detector R&D for ATLAS Upgrade

    Alexandra Moskaleva, a physics major at CSU Sacramento, worked at CERN during summer of 2010 on a project lead by Dr. Joerg Wotschack from CERN to develop and test the MicroMegas particle detector. Moskaleva was supported by Hu Institute Summer Research Grant of CSU Sacramento. MicroMegas is a gaseous micropattern muon detector and is a candidate for the ATLAS muon system upgrade. While MicroMegas detectors themselves are quite new, the CERN team developed a new design component for the detector by placing an insulative layer with resistive strips directly above the readout strips.
    Moskaleva's specific contributions include assisting to develop LabView code specifically for the MicroMegas detector and creating an event display. In the laboratory, there were four main MicroMegas detectors with slight differences between each other: R11, R12, and R13. She worked extensively in the laboratory testing the following attributes of the MicroMegas detector
  • Gain measurements on R11 (under gas mixture of 93:7 Ar:CO2), R12 (under gas mixture of 93:7 and 85:15 Ar:CO2), and R13 (under gas mixture of 93:7 and 85:15 Ar:CO2). A radioactive 55Fe and a high-intensity Cu source were used for these measurements to measure a gain over a wide spectrum of applied voltages and particle rates.

  • Transparency measurements on Gain measurements on R11 (under gas mixture of 93:7 Ar:CO2), R12 (under gas mixture of 93:7 and 85:15 Ar:CO2), and R13 (under gas mixture of 93:7 and 85:15 Ar:CO2). A radioactive 55Fe source was utilized.

  • Cosmics measurements with R11, R12, and R13. A trigger and acquisition system was setup such that R11 and R13 were placed on either side of R12. R11 and R13 were used to trigger on a cosmic particle, and a readout was taken from R12.

  • A charge up effect was also noticed in the laboratory and investigated. The effect was measured in R11 (under gas mixture of 93:7 Ar:CO2), R12 (under gas mixture of 93:7 and 85:15 Ar:CO2), and R13 (under gas mixture of 93:7 and 85:15 Ar:CO2). Again, a radioactive 55Fe and a high-intensity Cu source were used for these measurements to measure a gain over a wide spectrum of applied voltages and particle rates.

 

    Alexandra Moskaleva also participated in a test beam in July 2010, and contributed by covering eight eight-hour shifts, totaling 64 hours. During her stay at CERN, she also helped to set up experiments and take and record measurements, while monitoring data quality. Moskaleva gave several talks, poster presentation and colloquium at CSU Sacramento on her CERN work. She also gave a poser presentation at American Physical Society (APS) meeting in April, 2010 titled "Investigating a Candidate for ATLAS Muon System Upgrade".

     

    New ATLAS Simulation Packages NLOjet++ and APPLGrid

    Navid Rad, a physics graduate student at Fresno State, worked at CERN on NLOjet++ and APPLGrid in the ATLAS Jet Cross Section group with Dr. Tancredi Carli and Dr. Pavel Starovoitov during summer of 2011. Rad was supported by College of Science and Mathematics (CSM) and Instructionally Related Activities (IRA) from Associated Studetns Inc. (ASI) of Fresno State. Before Rad started working on this project, there were significant discrepancies between NLOjet++ and Pythia calculation of the jet cross sections. after looking into NLOjet++ and APPLGrid source code and comparing with Pythia manual carefully, Rad found out the main cause of the significant discrepancies. He presented his finding and results twice at the ATLAS Jet Cross Section working group meetings at CERN.

    After returning from CERN in fall 2011, Rad has been continuing his work with ATLAS Jet Cross Section working group. He will return to work at CERN during summer of 2012 on NLOjet++ and APPLGrid which will significantly reduce the Monte Carlo simulation time comparing with old simulation packages like Pythia. This will be very useful for many future physics analyses on ATLAS.

     

    Micromegas R&D for ATLAS Muon Detector Upgrade

    Emmanuel Angulo and Lawrence Carlson, physics graduate and undergraduate students at Fresno State, worked at CERN during summer of 2011 on micromegas R&D projects for ATLAS muon detector upgrade led by Dr. Joerg Wotschack of CERN. Angulo and Carlson were supported by College of Science and Mathematics (CSM) and Instructionally Related Activities (IRA) from Associated Studetns Inc. (ASI) of Fresno State. They developed and tested the micromegas detector and presented his results twice at the Micromegas R&D working group meetings at CERN. They also participated in test beam activities at CERN in July 2011.

     

    Simulation Using ATHENA with ATLAS Grid Computing Tier 3 Facility of Fresno State

    Michael Hatfield is an undergraduate student from CSU Pomona. He worked at CERN during summer of 2011 with Dr. Harinder Bawa on simulation using ATHENA framework with ATLAS Tier 3 facility of Fresno State. Hatfield generated new physics Monte Carlo samples through full detector simulation, digitization and reconstruction using ATHENA frame work on Fresno State Tier 3 facility which consists of 136 cores and 108 raw storage space. He also developed full chain script which can be ran with one Condor submission. The document Hartfield wrote about the simulation can be found here .